Dating japanese fender jazz bass

In late 1983, as it had in Europe and Japan, Fender decided to import Squier instruments into the United States in order to compete with the many copies flooding the domestic market.To make them stand out without competing directly with Fender's existing domestic models, these U.Music tastes at the time often ran to lower-than-low sub tones fueled by 7-string models, and Squier produced a short-lived 7-string Showmaster guitar.Throughout the early 2000s, Squier staples such as the Affinity and Standard series continued with few changes other than occasional color additions, although a new twin-pivot bridge with satin anodized saddles was added to the Standard Series (once again mirroring Fender in design evolution).Next came the existing Standard Series, and at the top of the line were the new Pro Tone models, fine instruments with special touches (aged plastic parts, shell pickguards, painted headcaps, etc.) that appealed to the growing number of Squier players who preferred to upgrade their instruments with after-market parts.

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Entry-level Affinity Series instruments were straightforward, basic Stratocaster, Telecaster and Precision Bass guitars in black, red and white.

The charm of Fender Jazz bass in sound and pitch is effectively reproduced Pickup: Mid to current: Alder trees do not grow "big", so multiple pieces were used for Fender guitar bodies.

Later jack cups are pressed steel and have smoother edges and smooth sides.

Using the slogan "There's Magic in the Breed," Fender re-launched the Squier name in the U. By 1989, the series had evolved to include the Squier II Stratocaster (which had a more modern-looking tremolo) several non-pickguard contemporary designs, and even the heavy metal HM Series, which featured pointed headstocks and flashy finishes.

These contemporary and HM series instruments soon disappeared quietly, but the Standard Series itself continued throughout the early 1990s and evolved into a new generation of Squier models.

While the brand has produced its share of innovative designs over the past 25 years, its main focus and most successful approach has always been to be the "value brand" alternative to its big brother, Fender. Fender entered the picture in the 1950s, when the V. Squier Company began supplying Southern California inventor and businessman Leo Fender with strings for his unusual new electric guitars. By the mid-1970s, the Squier name was retired as the strings had taken the Fender name.

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