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It is an all pervasive hum that we normally cannot hear.

But boost it a little, and a metallic and not very pleasant buzz fills the air.

“The power is sent out over the national grid to factories, shops and of course our homes.

Normally this frequency, known as the mains frequency, is about 50Hz,” explains Dr Alan Cooper, a senior digital forensic practitioner at the Met Police.

Tumbleweeds haven’t been turning here at end fence HQ; in fact, a village of two seems to be thriving into a global city of taste.

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“The grid operators will try and compensate for this, but you can sometimes see some very significant fluctuations,” explains Dr Cooper.

Forensic scientists have come up with the answer: they can authenticate these recordings with the help of a hum.

Electric find For the last seven years, at the Metropolitan Police forensic lab in south London, audio specialists have been continuously recording the sound of mains electricity.

A suspected terrorist has been taped planning a deadly attack, and the police want to use this evidence in court.

Or someone has been captured on CCTV threatening an assault.

So it does not matter if the recording has been made in Aberdeen or Southampton, the comparison will work.

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