Radio active rock dating

Radioactive dating is a method of dating rocks and minerals using radioactive isotopes.

This method is useful for igneous and metamorphic rocks, which cannot be dated by the stratigraphic correlation method used for sedimentary rocks. Some do not change with time and form stable isotopes (i.e.

The relationship between the two is: T = 0.693 / λ Many different radioactive isotopes and techniques are used for dating.

All rely on the fact that certain elements (particularly uranium and potassium) contain a number of different isotopes whose half-life is exactly known and therefore the relative concentrations of these isotopes within a rock or mineral can measure the age.

This decay process leads to a more balanced nucleus and when the number of protons and neutrons balance, the atom becomes stable.

This radioactivity can be used for dating, since a radioactive 'parent' element decays into a stable 'daughter' element at a constant rate.

Another way of expressing this is the half-life period (given the symbol T).

The half-life is the time it takes for half of the parent atoms to decay.

This technique also helps in determining the composition and evolution of the Earth's mantle and bodies in the universe.

This technique is good for iron meteorites and the mineral molybdenite.

This system is highly favoured for accurate dating of igneous and metamorphic rocks, through many different techniques.

This technique has become more widely used since the late 1950s.

Its great advantage is that most rocks contain potassium, usually locked up in feldspars, clays and amphiboles.

Radioactive decay is a natural process and comes from the atomic nucleus becoming unstable and releasing bits and pieces.

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